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Pediatrics and Development

By understanding how babies and children grow, researchers are learning how to address what happens when development goes awry and how to protect the most vulnerable among us from illness and injury.

Articles

Hard copies of the Breakthroughs in Bioscience and Horizons in Bioscience series are available upon request. Please include the desired article, quantity and purpose for the publication's use with your inquiry.

‘Breakthroughs in Bioscience’ explores the origins of vaccines

Posted on: September 30, 2015

 

Vaccines: Essential Weapons in the Fight Against Disease - Just a generation ago, one out of five children in the United States died before reaching adulthood.  Repeated epidemics swept through the world, killing as many as one-quarter of the population. Today, that frightening world no longer exists because of tremendous progress made in vaccine development and use. Vaccines save 2.5 million lives globally every year—the equivalent of preventing 7,000 deaths each day.  Download the PDF or listen to the podcast below:


The Human Microbiome: Your Own Personal Ecosystem

Posted on: March 24, 2015

 

The Human Microbiome: Your Own Personal Ecosystem - For more than three hundred years, scientists have observed, identified, and implicated individual microorganisms in specific diseases. More recently, with a convergence of scientific disciplines, an explosion in technical capabilities and revolutionary new ways of thinking, we are exploring the organisms with which we share our bodies. The effects of these organisms—our microbiome—on our health are only just being recognized. Download the PDF or listen to the podcast below:


How Biomedical Research Provides Fertility Hope to Cancer Survivors

Posted on: March 12, 2011

 

How Biomedical Research Provides Fertility Hope to Cancer Survivors - The process of reproduction has fascinated humans since ancient times. Hippocrates and Aristotle offered theories on conception and fertility, but it was not until the late 17th century that a Dutch scientist named Niels Stensen, who was studying the reproductive organs of animals, suggested that human ovaries might contain egg cells, or oocytes. Over a century later, this was definitively confirmed by one of the founding fathers of embryology, Carl Ernst von Baer.  Read more...


FASEB Releases New Breakthroughs in Bioscience Article Entitled "Life's Blood: Angiogenesis in Health and Disease"

Posted on: July 19, 2010

 

Life's Blood: Angiogenesis in Health and Disease - Angiogenesis, or the formation of new blood vessels, plays a critical role in a number of diseases and conditions, including cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and wound healing.  Read more..

 


Bone Buildings: The Science of Grafts, Biomaterials, and Bone Engineering

Posted on: March 15, 2009

 

Bone Buildings: The Science of Grafts, Biomaterials, and Bone Engineering - The science of bone grafting and bone biomaterials has provided extraordinary therapies for patients who have suffered bone loss through traumatic injury bone cancer or birth defects.  Read more...

 


Breathtaking Discoveries: How Basic Research Led to Treatments for Asthma

Posted on: March 15, 2007

 

Breathtaking Discoveries: How Basic Research Led to Treatments for Asthma - Fundamental research on the underlying causes of asthma has resulted in a greater understanding of this complex condition and the development of improved and diverse treatment options.  Read more...

 


Bubbles, Babies and Biology: The Story of Surfactant

Posted on: March 15, 2004

 

Bubbles, Babies and Biology: The Story of Surfactant - Pregnant ewes and premature lambs served as crucial animal models in early studies of using steroid treatment to prevent Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS).  Read more...

 


Genetic Research: Mining for Medical Treasures

Posted on: March 15, 2003

 

Genetic Research: Mining for Medical Treasures - "Knock-out" mice, in which specific genes have been inactivated, have been tremendously useful in helping researchers understand the genetic basis of disease. Moreover, "knock out" mice also serve as animal models for human diseases, allowing researchers to develop treatments and diagnostic tests for genetic diseases.  Read more...